Exploring the river banks

I’m always trying to find new views of places I walk all the time, to try to find new photos, and it surprises me afterwards – why did I never do that before?

Supports

Last week there was a Spring tide, and the grass on all the silt banks was washed flat, so it was the perfect chance to go down onto the bank at the end of the Chocolate Path.  I haven’t done this before, because the silt has holes and gaps that make it treacherous to walk on, and the grass hides that.

arches

It’s a strange feeling, like it’s forbidden, or something.  You can see people on the path taking a double look, but that’s probably about the careful footsteps, and clambering over the rivulets.  The big surprise was how much the sides of the path are eroding, and look bodged together.  I wanted to walk as far as the Outflow, but the bank narrows, with the trenches getting deeper, so we turned back.

It’s such a minor “new place”, but I loved it.  Definitely want to do that again.  More grey-ish photos below the jump…

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High tide, and experiments

Last night I was walking home in the dusk, under beautiful skies, and the tide was so high that the lock gates in the Cumberland Basin were left open, and 11.2 metre tide, per the Bristol Tide Tables, and that’s without any extra rainfall coming in from all the tributaries.

On evenings like this, it’s always hard to choose what to do, as the sun sets so quickly, and the river changes fast.  Between here and Vauxhall Bridge, where I left the water, the tide kept coming in, and it was a beautiful night – windy and gorgeous, and all my phone photos look like I’ve put crazy filters on them.

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Photo set – the theme of the day was “brown”

This week I went for a walk with Nikki Pugh, who makes really fantastic interactive art.  We walked very slowly down the Chocolate Path, looking at the clouds of silt under the surface of the river, and the tide changing from coming in to sitting still at the change point, to watching what happens in the hour after the highest tide.

We both took a lot of photos with the theme of “brown”, and you can see Nikki’s flickr photoset here, and mine in this slideshow (click for more):

Watching the tide drop 1

I also made a couple of small, quiet videos, of how the water was reacting before and after Vauxhall Bridge:

Come back soon to hear the podcast, and make sure you check out Nikki’s website, and follow her on twitter.

Soundwalk: Gaol Ferry Bridge to Vauxhall Bridge along the Chocolate Path

Today’s Soundwalk was from Gaol Ferry Bridge to Vauxhall Bridge, along the Chocolate Path, at 6pm on a sunny Thursday afternoon.

Looking down the river to the west, it was all reflections, with the water on the mud shining silver – but looking sideways at the River, the mud and water were both a warm brown, with clouds of sediment just under the water.  Very green trees after the recent rain, and it feels like there have been more rockslides into the New Cut, because of the high tide maybe?

Outflow films

During my photography degree, I made a series of films from the bridge on the Chocolate Path, above the sluices from the Underfall, recording the different ways the water reacted according to the weather, tide, and if water was being released from the Floating Harbour into the Avon.  I loved standing still in the same place, watching the water, listening to traffic mingling with birdsong, having these meditative moments just being by the river.

I love this spot in any mood – the rush of water being released at low tide; how it can be so slow one day, and so fast the next; the almost volcanic eruptions when the outflow is released below the surface; the way objects move around this little inlet; watching the rain on the water.

Three years ago this week, my final Degree Show included a long piece, where I recorded the water rising, and the debris on the surface making beautiful patterns.  So it feels appropriate to start this new project by re-visiting these films – there are a lot more on my Vimeo, and in my flickr album dedicated to the Outflow, and I’m sure I’ll be back to this spot often, and be making more of these.

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